Category Archives: Yugoslavia

Albanian Organized Crime in UK and Mainstream Media

One of the greatest Albanian achievements and contribution to UK society certainly occurred in 2006. It has been known as the world’s largest-ever cash robbery, with £53m stolen from a Securitas cash depot in Tonbridge, Kent, by a gang dressed in latex masks and police uniforms […]

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A Croatian Role in the Destruction of Yugoslavia in the 1990s (III)

The ultraright-wing ideology on which the state-building process was executed in Croatia in the 1990s was fundamentally anti-liberal and above all anti-Serb. In order to solve, as proclaimed, the most important problem in Croatia – the “Serb Question”, Croatia’s authorities privileged national (ethnic Croat) rights over the individual rights, ethnic (Croat) state over the civic multicultural society and political authoritarianism instead of institutional democracy […]

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Independent” Kosovo: Gangland Spills Savagery Worldwide

Dick Marty’s report showed that the KLA headed by Kosovo present-day premier Hashim Thaci (a notorious butcher nicknamed the Snake) kidnapped Serbs resident in the province and the Albanians suspected of collaborating with Belgrade, to traffic them to the north of Albania, where the people were killed and their organs carved out for sale on the black market […]

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Five Facts About Kosovo the Fakenews Media is Lying to You About

Kosovo was never a political entity of any kind until 1945, when the Communist regime that reconstructed Yugoslavia after Axis occupation (with which Albanians overwhelmingly collaborated) created the “Autonomous Region of Kosovo & Metohija” – the latter being a Greek word describing church lands […]

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A Croatian Role in the Destruction of Yugoslavia in the 1990s (II)

Probably, the HDZ’s deny of any kind of the regional autonomy in Croatia was the expression of the policy of anti-liberal democracy concept of minority rights. Therefore, the regional parties of Istria, the Serbian Krayina and Dalmatia suffered mostly from such policy of a brutal centralization of Croatia […]

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A Croatian Role in the Destruction of Yugoslavia in the 1990s (I)

Today, as a result of the HDZ’s policy of extreme ethno-confessional nationalism, Croatia is, since mid-1995, “more ethnically homogeneous than ever was in the historic past”. The Serb population on the present-day territory of Croatia fell from 24 percent in 1940 to 12 percent in 1990 and 4 percent in 1996 with the practice of its everyday assimilation (Croatization) and emigration from Croatia […]

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The Western “Math-Gangsters” and the Kosovization of Macedonia

What is really missing in the Western media reports on Macedonia’s referendum is a very and fundamental fact that 36% of the active voters were, in fact, predominantly ethnic Albanians while ethnic Macedonians boycotted it. This fact once again opened an Albanian Pandora box in Macedonia forcing domestic politicians and political analysts to start rethinking about Albanian-Macedonian relations after the dissolution of Yugoslavia […]

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Yalta, 1945: The Impact on Yugoslavia

American and British leaders knew the facts about Yugoslavia. They knew the nature of the Josip Broz Tito Partisan Movement. They grasped that the goal or objective was to install a Soviet-style Communist dictatorship. Briefing and position papers had been submitted by the parties at the conference. The U.S. State Department assessed the scenarios in Yugoslavia. A special paper was presented on Yugoslavia […]

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Understanding Balkan Geopolitics

After three trips to Moscow, St. Petersburg and the Crimea this year, and twelve visits to Russia over the past three years, I can say with some certainty that Moscow does not have a coherent strategy in the Balkan region. There are many divergent policies at play. There’s the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which is staffed by many people appointed during the tenure of Andrei Kozyrev in the 1990’s, who now occupy senior positions […]

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Rape and War: Bosnian Muslim Rapes at the Celebici Camp

Bosnian Muslim Hazim Delic, the deputy commander of the Celebici camp, was found guilty of rape and murder and given a sentence of 20 years in prison. Bosnian Muslim Esad Landzo, who had admitted some crimes, was found guilty of murder and sentenced to 15 years in prison. The senior Bosnian Muslim military commander of the Celebici area, Zejnil Dalalic, was acquitted on all charges. His conviction would implicate the Bosnian Muslim “government” and Bosnian Muslim president Alija Izetbegovic, who was known to have toured and inspected the Celebici camp […]

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Macedonia and the US-NATO Cold War

Macedonia will probably become a member of the US-NATO anti-Russia military alliance, along with Ukraine, and the confrontation with Russia will continue to escalate in the new US-NATO Cold War […]

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The Idea of a Greater Croatia by Pavao Ritter Vitezović (II)

P. R. Vitezović’s writings were especially directed against pro-Venetian texts of the famous historian and doctor of law from Dalmatian city of Trogir – Ivan Lučić (Lucius Joannes 1604–1679) – who is traditionally considered as a founder of the Croatian scientific historiography. Lučić’s most important work – De Regno Dalmatiae et Croatiae libri six (“The Kingdom of Dalmatia and Croatia in Six Volumes”), Amsterdam, 1668 – that includes many narrative sources, genealogical tables and historical-geographical maps, tells the historical truth that Dalmatia in former time was a separate territory from the state of Croatia and, in fact, the Venetian possession […]

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The Srebrenica Massacre as Paradigmatic Media Spin

First, we should put the issue of Srebrenica in some sort of general framework. As with most unspontaneous events, special operations mounted to achieve some political effect, Srebrenica is a purposely a multilayered affair. As an American scholar who has devoted an inordinate amount of time to Srebrenica, Prof. Edward Herman, has put it, far from being a straightforward story “Srebrenica symbolizes the triumph of propaganda at the end of the twentieth century” […]

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The Idea of a Greater Croatia by Pavao Ritter Vitezović (I)

The article will examine the model for the creation of a Greater Croatia designed by a Croatian nobleman, publicist and historian Pavao Ritter Vitezović (1652–1713). The article will offer a new interpretation of the substance and significance of Vitezović’s political ideology. Many historians have viewed Vitezović’s political thought and his developed ideological framework of a united South Slavic state as part of a wider pan-Slavic world […]

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Persecuted Serbian Orthodox Church: The Islamization of Kosovo

The NATO occupation was seen by Arab/Muslim countries as an opportunity to transform Kosovo-Metohija into a Muslim state. Terry Boyd in the Stars and Stripes article “In Kosovo, Islamic groups work to rebuild country, attract followers,” September 21, 2001, examined how Muslim countries were seeking the Islamization of Kosovo. The US State Department listed Kosovo as having active cells of al-Qaeda, Ossama bin Laden’s terrorist network. Al-Qaeda and Ossama bin Laden were aiding the UCK jihad in Kosovo […]

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Gavrilo Princip or Franz Ferdinand? Heroes or Villains?

Gavrilo Princip’s house in Sarajevo was destroyed three times and rebuilt twice. The house was first destroyed by Austro-Hungarian forces during World War I, by Croatian Ustasha forces during World War II, and by Bosnian Muslim forces during the 1992-1995 civil war […]

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Liberators over Vratnica

Vratnica was a village located in northwestern Macedonia at the border with Kosovo and Metohija. It had been part of Serbia after the First Balkan War in 1912 […]

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Draza Mihailovich in Film: “A Trap For the General” (1971)

Klopka za generala is a failed attempt to falsify history and to create a national foundation based on a delusional house of cards. Ironically, the only reason this movie has any interest for anyone today is because of its falsified portrayal of Draza Mihailovich. The movie shows that lies and deceptions are like lines written in the sand. They cannot withstand the scrutiny of time. In the final analysis, history renders its own verdict and judgment […]

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Who Are the Albanians?

Article by Vladislav B. Sotirović: “Who are the Albanians? The Illyrian Anthroponomy and the Ethnogenesis of the Albanians – A Challenge to Regional Security”, Serbian Studies: Journal of the North American Society for Serbian Studies, Vol. 26, 2012, № 1−2, ISSN 0742-3330, 2015, Slavica Publishers, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA, pp. 45−76 […]

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Greece and Slavo-Macedonians (1913-1993)

During J. B. Tito’s rule (1945−1980), Macedonian nationalism had always been controlled by the central government but after his death in 1980 the control was gradually loosened and Macedonian nationalism started to flourish as all other nationalist sentiments within the whole country […]

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New Strategic Calculus for the Balkans

Newly crowned NATO members Albania and Croatia continue to pose the greatest threat to the Central Balkans. Croatia used to be the primary vehicle for unipolar military activity in the region during the 1990s, but this role was ultimately transferred to Albania for dual deployment against both Serbia and Macedonia […]

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A “Magnum Crimen” – The Book

The book describes the activities of the Roman Catholic clergy in the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, including their intention and attempts to become above the state, to control the state and eventually the everyday lives of the common people […]

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What’s in a Name? Everything and Nothing

Ever since Macedonia declared independence from Yugoslavia 25 years ago, Greece insisted that the United Nations call the country the “Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia,” which became an acronym known as FYROM […]

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Washington’s “Humanitarian” War and the KLA’s Crimes

Only two trials of KLA personnel have ever been held at the ICTY, compared to the scores involving Serbs. In the second trial the then prime minister Ramush Haradinaj was acquitted of war crimes charges with the trial judge complaining about the “significant difficulties” securing witness testimony […]

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Zoran Djindjic: The Quisling Of Belgrade

An article originally published by The Guardian, UK on March 14th, 2003. Tributes to Zoran Djindjic, the assassinated prime minister of Serbia, have been pouring in. President Bush led the way, praising his “strong leadership”, while the Canadian government’s spokesman extolled a “heralder of democracy” and Tony Blair spoke of the energy Djindjic had devoted to “reforming Serbia” […]

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Kosovo: An Evil Little War

What began six years ago may have been Albright’s War on Clinton’s watch, but both Albright and Clinton have been gone from office for what amounts to a political eternity […]

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“Regime Change” in Serbia, 1945 and 2000

The third congress of AVNOJ (AVNOJ – Antifiascist Council of People’s Liberation of Yugoslavia) in Belgrade, on August 10, 1945, proclaimed the “Democratic Federated Yugoslavia” – as you can see, the Communists had a soft spot for using the adjective “democratic” […]

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Déjà Vu in the Balkans

From Slovenia to the Republic of Macedonia, each constituent member of the former Yugoslavia is now infused with their own destabilizing vulnerabilities that have only been exacerbated by the “refugee crisis” […]

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