Tag Archives: Vuk

The Croatian National Revival Movement (1830–1847) and the Serbs (III)

In the Yugoslav historiography (1918–1941; 1945–1991) Lj. Gaj’s decision to choose a Illyrian name and the štokavian dialect for the Croatian national revival movement was politically explained by his wish to culturally and even politically unite all the South Slavs, believing that this was an ancient common name for all the (Balkan) Slavs, because he like the other leaders of the Illyrian Movement considered the ancient Balkan Illyrians (or Illyrs) as the South Slavic and even Slavic ancestors. However, this decision had much deeper roots and totally different purposes than it was officially presented by the Yugoslav historians. An undisputable fact is that Lj. Gaj chose the Serbian literal language (based on the people’s spoken language) for the literal language of all Croats. Gaj by himself recognized that the Croatian leaders of the national revival movement accepted exactly the Serbian literal language, which was reformed by Vuk Stefanović Karadžić, for the literal language of the Croats […]

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Western Kosovo Meta-Mythology and Serbian Ethnohistory

A historic place of Gazimestan means to the Serbs the same as Golgotha to the Christians, and the West Wall to the Jews. There is no Serb kid who has not read some parts from the collection of the Kosovo cycle poetry, folk or otherwise. Kosovo-Metochia (KosMet) may be torn out from Serbia (and the Serbs), just as the Temple has been destroyed and the Jews left Judea […]

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The Croatian National Revival Movement (1830–1847) and the Serbs (I)

This text investigates the question of relations between the Croatian national revival movement and the Serbs from 1830 to 1847. Special investigation attention is put on the problem of how the language influenced ethnonational group identity among the Croats and Serbs in Dalmatia, Croatia and Slavonia (the so-called Triune Kingdom) during the period of the Croatian national revival movement that was officially and not only formally named as the Illyrian Movement […]

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